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Civil Rights

Voting Discrimination Tip Card

The Arizona Civil Rights Act makes it unlawful to deny any qualified citizen the right to vote because of race, color, religion, gender, national origin, disability or ancestry.

Denial of the right to vote includes, but is not limited to:

Discrimination in Places of Public Accommodation Tip Card

Arizona law makes it unlawful for a public accommodation to discriminate because of race, color, religion, national origin, ancestry, sex or disability.

Examples of places of public accommodation may include:

  • Restaurants
  • Banks
  • Hotels or motels
  • Museums
  • Parks
  • Day care centers
  • Health clubs
  • Grocery and department stores
  • Theaters
  • Medical, dental or health care facilities

Housing Discrimination Tip Card

Arizona law makes it an unlawful housing practice to discriminate in connection with housing because of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, familial status, disability or ancestry.

Discrimination may include, but is not limited to:

Employment Discrimination Tip Card

Arizona law makes it an unlawful employment practice to discriminate because of race, color, religion, sex, age (40 years old or older), national origin or disability.

Examples of discrimination may include, but are not limited to:

Pre-Employment Inquiries

Purpose of Guide:

The Arizona Civil Rights Act contains a number of specific provisions designed to prevent discrimination in employment. Although the Act does not expressly prohibit pre-employment inquiries based on an applicant’s race, color, religion, sex, age, disability or national origin, such questions usually bear no demonstrable relationship to a job applicant’s abilities or qualifications and, consequently, serve no lawful purpose.

Housing Discrimination: Get The Facts

In 1963, I marched with thousands of people on Washington, D.C. to hear Martin Luther King give his transformational “I have a dream” speech in which he said all people should be judged by the “content of their character.”

Employment Discrimination: Get the Facts

In 1963, I marched with thousands of people on Washington, D.C. to hear Martin Luther King give his transformational “I have a dream” speech in which he said all people should be judged by the “content of their character.”

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